Lurka – Quality Control

Quality control is a virtue that is often ignored in this time. With the accelerated, summarized and often simplified pace of life in which we often find our sentiments and feelings narrowed down to 140 characters, one word hashtags, 10 second snapchats, instagram updates and absent minded fast forwards through youtube clips, with the next interaction already in mind. When it comes to the art of music and it's presentation in 2015, more than ever, faux-hype can be easily achieved with some basic social media skills, 'acceptable' graphic design can be achieved via an app on the phone, a 'record label' can be founded simultaneously with the initiation of a bandcamp account, and indeed the basic model of a successful piece of music can be re-created by following a few production guidelines and having access to a decent sample-pack. It is easy to prioritise the 'relevant' knack for promotion and networking over the hard, strenuous graft that comes with indulgence in furthering one's individual palette, musical skill and personality in the music. The laborious hours living on the edge of depression, dealing with the pressure of representing something so utterly personal to a wide platform of listeners becomes ever-more real when the heart is behind the creativity, when it's not solely a cry for attention, the need to rise amongst the social struggle, striving for moments of 'internet fame' – something that is fast becoming ingrained in modern culture. With the (seemingly) easy route in sight at all times, we can't blame certain people for taking the less personal route, joining a niche rather than finding their own. We would be lying if we said we weren't slightly biased on this article, as Benjamin is a good friend of ours – we have had the pleasure of hearing a lot of the music that has come out of his studio over the years – but this gives us further validation for this piece of writing. We are aware of the excruciatingly high standards that he sets for himself. Having worked as a mixing engineer and taking equal interest in the raw code of music and it's sound design, it is not often that his productions pass his gates and enable him to pass them on to a hungry label's A&R section. Lurka seems to have a clear vision of what validates a track for release, and a big part of this is down to personal satisfaction on all levels, putting big importance into creating something that swerves the norm, whilst pushing for new levels in his sonic palette. The latest 12” on Black Acre will be his first record this year, mostly due to the above reasons and restrictions. We think that upon listening to his output – really closely listening (on some good speakers) – you will be able to hear the details, the impeccable placement of frequency and the creative use of rhythm and it's surrounding space. It is clear that his music undergoes strict quality control and a sense for perfection, even before the label has their hands on it. With a canny sense for guttural bassline and skeletal rhythm, Lurka's records sound utterly unique whilst having their place in contemporary music. Expertly perusing the analogue qualities of his valve compressor, the unpredictability of his battered bass-amp, and the clean, yet gritty sound he coaxes out of his 80's digital reverb and his concise signal processing, Lurka manages to create alarming, deranged frequencies that blast across a cutting-edge focus for bass and drum. Lurka's tracks are informed by the dancefloor, ready to work the soundsystem in a devastating manner, all whilst giving the ears and brain proper workout. His latest release for Black Acre, gives us potent dose of what Lurka has been cooking up in the kitchen, Partials and it's B-Side counterpart 'Mach' are making serious waves whilst we eagerly wait for his next release.